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What does my cat need to thrive?

In this blog we will look at the essential elements you need to have in place to help your cat thrive in their environment.
What does my cat need to survive?

For a cat to survive they need their basic needs met, which would include:

 Litter tray(s)
 Food
 Water
 Shelter
 Safety

I’m hopeful that anyone reading this will be able to give themselves a pat on the back as you already provide the basics for your cat. Some people may even feel that those items listed are so basic that we shouldn’t even bother mentioning them.

Yet…not everyone is aware of the basic needs that need to be met for a cat, so it’s important we highlight them to start with.

Now, what we can do is look into how we move from helping your cat to survive (with the elements mentioned above) to enabling them to thrive!

What is the difference between your cat surviving or thriving?

In my opinion, surviving is literally going through the motions every day. Existing: eating, sleeping, breathing, being.

Thriving is: engaging with others in/around the home, having relationships that love and nurture. Being nourished by food and nutrition. Having balanced mental and emotional health. Good physical condition.

When we use the term holistic approach it means looking at the cat as a whole. What affects them, impacts them, influences them. When you look at your cat using this perspective, you can see where you can do more to help your cat. The more you can do for your cat, the more you can help them to thrive.

Here’s a short breakdown of how you can help your cat to thrive. Take a look at the list and see…what’s the one thing you can do for your cat today?

Mental health

 Dedicated play time.
 Different toys/rooms used for play time.
 Spaces to hide away.
 Heights to retreat to.
 Treat balls/toys.

Physical health

 Diet upgrade: Dry to wet, wet to raw, raw and real.
What food stuffs can you offer your cat to improve their nutrition?
        Eggs – cooked or raw.
        Freeze dried options.
        Canned fish (in oil or spring water).
 More play!
 Supplement support.
Cat grass.

Emotional health

 Herb garden.
 Brushes and bonding time.
 Quiet time with you.
Time away from other animals in the home.

Energetic/Spiritual health

 Meditation – with you!
Colour therapy.
Energy work/support.
Self-selection.

What are you drawn to?

From the lists above, what sparks your interest? What are you curious about?

I’ve added links where I can, to help you learn a little more.

When we co-exist with a cat, we are together for a reason. We are together for both souls to grow and evolve. We are with each other to learn and support one another.

Don’t look at the list above and think you need to do it all, just look at one thing you can do.

One small difference will help your cat.

One small change will support them and enable them to thrive.

Let your cat inspire you to learn a new skill, to investigate a new topic or approach.

Be open to how you can thrive as you help your cat to.

I hope you have enjoyed this blog.

Feel free to get in touch info@naturallycats.co.uk and let me know what is the one thing you are going to do/try/read about to help your cat to thrive today?

With Love,
Julie-Anne, Leo and Baby Max xxx

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